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Magnitudo News 24: aggiornamenti in tempo reale su terremoti e ricorrenze storiche di eventi sismici rilevanti, in Italia e nel mondo.

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  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    8 dicembre 2017

    File "vampire fish video" under science fact rather than science fiction. This U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) video shows collaborative research to help control invasive sea #lamprey in the Great Lakes: https://youtu.be/1HmpW93tESo. #invasivespecies #GreatLakes #USGS #science

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    8 dicembre 2017

    #USGS #avalanche #science is an all year effort that supports our Glacier National Park partners in opening the Going-to-the-Sun Road in each spring. Learn more: https://www.facebook.com/GlacierNPS/photos/a.360427434911.154957.74553624911/10155373307874912/?type=3&theater

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    7 dicembre 2017

    We share many things with our animal friends, like habitats, resources, and even genes. But contrary to what you learned in preschool, sharing is not always polite. Zoonotic diseases or infections are those that spread between animals and humans, such as Lyme disease, some strains of highly pathogenic avian flu, rabies, and plague. #Zoonotic illnesses range from mild to severe and, in extreme circumstances, can be deadly to animals, humans, or both. Seven of 10 zoonotic diseases originate in wildlife. Read more about this USGS #Earthword at https://go.usa.gov/xnN3s. Image: Lyme disease is a zoonotic disease spread by ticks. (Credit: Graham Hickling, University of Tennessee) #USGS #science #wildlifedisease #wildlifehealth

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  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    7 dicembre 2017

    The Quality of the Nation’s Groundwater: Progress on a National Survey The USGS is near the midpoint of a complex undertaking to survey the quality of the nation’s largest drinking-water resource. The latest results from four regional aquifers have become available today and add to previously released results for five other regional aquifers. About half of the nation’s population relies on groundwater for drinking water. As the nation’s population grows, the need for high-quality drinking-water supplies becomes even more urgent. Learn more: https://www.usgs.gov/news/quality-nation-s-groundwater-progress-a-national-survey

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    6 dicembre 2017

    What happens deep underground can affect us all — especially when #groundwater is involved. USGS scientists have shed new light on the processes that cause higher-than-typical levels of naturally occurring radium in untreated groundwater from a key Midwestern aquifer. The study helps explain the causes of high radium levels in the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer, which underlies six states and provides drinking water to more than a million people. Learn more: https://on.doi.gov/2jNsZqz

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    6 dicembre 2017

    An unexplored consequence of Hurricane Maria’s devastation of Puerto Rico is the effect of the near-total defoliation of the island on its water resources. The winds of Hurricane Maria uprooted trees and removed nearly all the leaves from the trees that remained in the rainforests covering the island’s mountain slopes. USGS scientists have been studying one rainforest in Puerto Rico in particular — El Yunque National Forest (also the Luquillo Experimental Forest), on the eastern end of the island — for more than 10 years to better understand the importance of precipitation from various weather patterns to the forest water supply. Now that the forest’s composition has drastically changed, the focus of the work will shift to trying to better understand how the natural water cycle (including cloud water inputs) is affected by defoliation of this scale. These pictures provide before and after shots of parts of El Yunque and underscore the degree of the change. While the forest is expected to recover over time, USGS scientists will study what happens to the water cycle of this region of the island during its recovery. Learn more about the USGS’ work in El Yunque, in collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service's International Institute of Tropical Forestry, and the National Science Foundation (NSF)’s Critical Zone Observatory program: https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2016-1166, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agrformet.2017.04.010, and http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2013WR014413/pdf

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    5 dicembre 2017

    Did you know groundwater is a major source of water to streams, lakes, and wetlands in the United States? The USGS Upper Midwest Water Science Center is studying how groundwater pumping could be affecting where and how much groundwater is flowing into Wolf Creek near Vestaburg, Michigan. In this photo you can see two tools USGS scientists are using in the Michigan study. The boxes are seepage meters, which capture groundwater flowing up through the bottom of the Creek to measure the amount and rate of groundwater discharging into the Creek at that location. The blue fiber optic cable on the left side of the photo measures temperature along the stream bed, to help scientists locate temperature differences that could be a result of groundwater flowing into the Creek. Get all the latest USGS groundwater science with our monthly Groundwater News and Highlights: https://water.usgs.gov/ogw/highlights/ To learn more about this topic, view a fact sheet on effects of groundwater pumping on streamflow at https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2013/3001/ To learn more about the USGS Upper Midwest Water Science Center, visit https://mi.water.usgs.gov/ #water #groundwater #science #fieldwork

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    5 dicembre 2017

    Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow....in Hawaii!

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    5 dicembre 2017

    The Power of Paper Maps: Maps are critical to helping people navigate better to familiar places, go to new locations or explore the world around us. USGS supervisory cartographer and avid mountain bike enthusiast, Brian Fox, puts forward the case for the continued relevance of paper maps in recreation and other uses. Article appears in the November edition of “Dirt Rag" magazine: http://dirtragmag.com/access-the-power-of-paper-maps/ Photo : Greg Floyd via MTB Project

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    5 dicembre 2017

    Birds and flu: They can get it, too. Some avian influenza, or bird flu, viruses are able to enter North America from other continents through migrating birds, can be deadly to poultry, and can infect waterfowl populations. #USGS scientists studied the avian #flu viruses that spread in the U.S. during 2014-2015 - an outbreak that resulted in more than $3 billion in losses to the U.S. #poultry industry. The study found that even though the viruses likely evolved in Asia, they easily infected and spread among North American wild #birds. The viruses were also able to spread between domestic and wild birds in a process called spillover. Learn more at https://go.usa.gov/xnXwg. Photo: Stephen Ausmus, USDA Agricultural Research Service #science #wildlifedisease

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  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    1 dicembre 2017

    It was landslides day on Capitol Hill today! Members of the USGS Landslides Program and interagency partners from around the country briefed congressional staff members and key stakeholders in a series of presentations called, “Gravity Never Sleeps: Landslide Risk Across the Country.” The presentations provided information on landslide causes and impacts, current and ongoing research, and mitigation efforts to protect America’s communities. This information can help legislators understand how vital USGS science is for assisting emergency planners and community leaders prepare for landslide events. For more information on the USGS Landslide Hazards Program, go to https://landslides.usgs.gov/ #oso #landslides

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    30 novembre 2017

    Watch LIVE or online! Thursday, November 30th, 2017, 7:00 p.m. PDT USGS, Rambo Auditorium, Bldg. 3 Menlo Park, California Sea Otters: Confessions of a Keystone Carnivore by Tim Tinker, USGS Research Wildlife Biologist Sea otters are perhaps the best-known example of a "keystone predator". Sea otter behavior -- in particular diet specialization and limited mobility -- can mediate their effects on ecosystem dynamics. Other predators, especially large sea stars, can complement and reinforce the keystone role of sea otters: this became apparent with the loss of all sea stars from wasting disease. https://online.wr.usgs.gov/calendar/

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    30 novembre 2017

    #USGS on FIRE! Fire science not only underlies all the training and tools used by firefighters, but it is also critical to address the rising wildfire risk to help save lives, property, our wildlands and money. With only a month left in 2017, the nation has been ravaged by more than 50,000 wildfires that burned more than 8.9 million acres, the third-highest number of large wildfire acres in the last ten years. Yet our USGS fire science lead, Paul Steblein, is optimistic about our ability to better manage wildfires of the future, in part because of the large cadre of federal, university and other fire researchers committed to science that supports the immediate needs of wildfire managers and also helps them determine the best ways to manage lands to lessen wildfire risks. Check out some burningly hot research projects at https://www.usgs.gov/news/usgs-fire-it-s-not-a-matter-if-it-s-a-matter-more-fire-science-data-please #USGSonFire U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Bureau of Land Management Bureau of Reclamation U.S. Forest Service National Interagency Fire Center

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    29 novembre 2017

    #NativeAmericanHeritageMonth - The Nisqually River begins in the glaciers of Mount Rainier National Park and meanders about 80 miles before it empties into Puget Sound at the Nisqually River delta. The Nisqually River delta restorations culminated in 2009 when the Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, the Nisqually Indian Tribe, and Ducks Unlimited restored and reconnected historical salt marsh to Puget Sound waters. Including previous restoration led by the Nisqually Indian Tribe, almost 900 acres of historical wetlands are in the process of being restored to tidal wetlands. The #USGS Western Ecological Research Center (WERC) partners with the tribe and refuge to follow the restoration progress and assess wildlife benefits as a result of the restoration efforts in the delta. In addition to providing habitat for a variety of wildlife like coho and chinook salmon and waterbirds, and support for local economies the river is central to the identity and heritage of the Nisqually Tribe. Visit the Nisqually Tribe website: http://www.nisqually-nsn.gov/ More on the USGS WERC project: https://www.usgs.gov/centers/werc/science/wetland-restoration-san-francisco-bay-delta-and-pacific-northwest Image: USGS scientist sampling an invertebrate fallout trap in the Nisqually River Delta. (Sierra Blakely, USGS) #USGS #science #WildlifeWednesday #estuaries #deltas #PacificCoast

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    29 novembre 2017

    #WildlifeWednesday - USGS is on the front-lines of grizzly bear research. Wildlife Biologist Frank van Manen and the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team are on a mission to discover how many grizzly bears roam the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, how they utilize the landscape they inhabit, and where they might end up next. Science In The Extremes provides an overview of a bear biologist and the species he studies: https://www.facebook.com/ScienceInTheExtremes/videos/292273717928653/ Find out more about this apex predator and efforts to study the population: #qt-science_center_objects">https://www.usgs.gov/science/interagency-grizzly-bear-study-team?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects The following video also contains footage of black bears, which co-occur with grizzly bears throughout the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. #USGS #science #bears #conservation #biologist #Yellowstone #GYE

  • Post ufficiale da Facebook
    USGeologicalSurvey
    28 novembre 2017

    Enjoyed Disney Pixar's #Coco? Then dive back into a fascinating underworld in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula with us and Texas A&M University Galveston Campus: https://go.usa.gov/xn8xu In the underground rivers and flooded caves of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, where Mayan lore described a fantastical underworld, we've found a cryptic world in its own right. It's a topsy-turvy place, where the foodweb is based on methane and gases flow *down* instead of up. Image shows a cave diver swimming through the Ox Bel Ha cave system near Tulum, in the Mexican state of Quintana Roo. Image is copyright HP Hartmann and is used with permission. #USGS #Science #Cave #CaveDivingMexico #Cenotes #CaveDiving

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Magnitudo News 24: aggiornamenti in tempo reale su terremoti e ricorrenze storiche di eventi sismici rilevanti, in Italia e nel mondo.

Il terremoto. Uno dei fenomeni più imprevedibili e potenzialmente mortali sul pianeta Terra. Una catastrofe naturale che periodicamente si abbatte su alcuni Paesi del mondo.

Solo dall'inizio del XXI secolo l'Italia è stata colpita da ben 23 terremoti con magnitudo superiore a 5.0 gradi della scala Richter. Undici di questi hanno raggiunto magnitudo 5.5, 7 dei quali hanno superato magnitudo 5.8, 3 hanno raggiunto magnitudo 6.0 e 1, quello di Norcia del 30 Ottobre 2016, è arrivato a magnitudo 6.5, attestandosi come il terremoto più forte degli ultimi 37 anni. Questi disastri hanno causato in Italia, in 17 anni, 705 vittime, la maggior parte di queste uccise dal terremoti del 6 Aprile 2009 a L'Aquila (309) e da quello del 24 Agosto 2016 di Amatrice (300); senza dimenticare i 28 bambini e le 2 maestre che hanno perso la vita nel terremoto del 30 Ottobre 2002 a San Giuliano di Puglia, le 29 vittime del terremoto che ha provocato la slavina sul Rigopiano il 18 Gennaio 2017 e le 27 vittime uccise dai due terremoti che hanno colpito l'Emilia il 20 e il 29 Maggio 2012.

Tuttavia, tornando indietro e scavando fra le macerie di quella che è la lunga storia sismica italiana, ci si rende conto che il primo quindicennio del XX secolo fu segnato da catastrofi nettamente superiori rispetto a quelle che stiamo vivendo noi oggi.

Infatti, gli eventi sismici di quegli anni si rivelarono molto più distruttivi e le vittime furono molte di più. Solo il terremoto di magnitudo 7.2 della scala Richter del 28 Dicembre 1908 che colpì lo Stretto di Messina causò 80-120 mila vittime. Gravissimo anche il terremoto di magnitudo 7.0 che colpì l'Abruzzo il 13 Giugno 1915, provocando più di 30 mila vittime. Si ricordano inoltre i terremoti di magnitudo 7.0 che colpì Nicastro, in Calabria, l'8 Settembre 1905, che causò 557 vittime, quello di magnitudo 5.9 che colpì la Calabria Meridionale il 23 Ottobre 1907, causando 167 vittime; il terremoto di magnitudo 5.3 dell'8 Maggio 1914, che provocò 70 morti a Linera, in Sicilia, quello di Calitri, in Campania del 1910 (50 vittime) e infine quello del 1911 in Sicilia (13 vittime).

Per questo, la consapevolezza che arriva dalla nostra storia su quanto il nostro territorio sia fragile dovrebbe proiettarci verso il progresso e farci capire che la prevenzione sismica nel paese dovrebbe essere un'assoluta priorità dei cittadini e del governo, ma purtroppo non è così. Solo gli scienziati e alcuni storici sembrano realmente interessati al problema effettivo che corrono milioni di cittadini, quotidianamente esposti ad un elevatissimo rischio sismico.